exhibition

Interview: Mandi Symonds

Although most of the action appears to be going on in Edinburgh throughout Au

Author's review: 
0

Here Comes Trouble Review - Blue Elephant Theatre

Keira Martin choreographs and performs this intelligent and engaging piece based on the trials and tribulations of her life, both as an Irish dancer and a woman.

Author's review: 
4

The Merry Wives of Windsor Review - Theatre N16

In the gorgeous Shakespearean Globe Space at Theatre N16 for two performances only, comes one of Shakespeare's lesser-spotted plays: The Merry Wives of Windsor.

Author's review: 
4

Othello review - Tobacco Factory, Bristol

The latest Shakespeare at the Tobacco Factory production of Othello feels discomfortingly relevant.

Author's review: 
4

Turner Contemporary Unveils ‘Entangled: Threads & Making' - all female art exhibition

Entangled is curated by writer and critic Karen Wright which celebrates making processes through an all-woman line up of artists. At Turner Contemporary, Margate, from Saturday 28 January until Sunday 7 May 2017. Admission is free.

Author's review: 
0

Richard III review - Rosemary Branch Theatre

I’ve seen a few Richard IIIs in my time. And whether it be Trevor Nunn’s trilogy at the Rose Theatre Kingston or a fringe production up in Edinburgh - I’ve always found myself wanting to leave at the interval. Until now.

Author's review: 
4

LOVE, National Theatre - Review

Over the past year there has been a public debate about the relevance of theatre to people in the UK today, especially for the disenfranchised and given the way the referendum turned out. On the evidence of LOVE, theatre is more relevant than it has ever been, across all stratum of society.

Author's review: 
5

LAURA, Bread & Roses Theatre - Review

“Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned.” So goes the old adage.

Author's review: 
0

HEDDA GABLER, National Theatre - Review

Henrik Ibsen's Hedda Gabler is not an 'easy' play. On the surface its central character exhibits anti-social tendencies, but her actions in the latter half of the play are unconscionable. But nothing exists in a vacuum and the reasons for her 'lack of empathy' provide illuminating psychological insights.

Author's review: 
4

The Collective Project 2016, Tristan Bates Theatre - Review

A parliament of owls, a kindle of kittens, a bevy of ladies, a worship of writers. The collective names for animals and types of people are fascinating and often very funny. Using this as an inspirational jumping off point, the Pensive Federation's Collective Project  offers a diverse selection of humorous and thought-provoking short plays that comment – directly or indirectly – on the nature of groups.

Author's review: 
4

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